A Cryptic Traditional Catholic Travelogue 10: Pyramids on the Nile

webb

Rural village church of Vaylats, Franc

Rural village church of Vaylats, France. The statues of Jesus and Mary were massive, perhaps 10 feet in height. Erected in 1895 with a style influenced by the Sacré Coeur de Montmartre. Photo: K. Buck

 

Introduction 2013: This is the tenth part of a little series I wrote whilst travelling through France in the summer of 2010.

I felt like I was witnessing the devasted ruins of a former civilisation: Catholic France. Or La Vraie France as the French used to call it: the true France.

This series is best appreciated by beginning with the first part here about the beginning of my journey in Lourdes.

From 2010:

Fragmentary:

Like the Pyramids along the Nile

Like the Sphinx

These are things I have remarked to myself, privately till now, in these travels through France.

For how often it has felt like I behold the relics of a long-lost civilisation.

True, many of these weather-beaten crucifixes along the roads are barely a century old.

These worn, fading statues of Our Lady are also relatively recent…

Is my analogy not somewhat excessive then?

To compare such monuments to the remains of a civilisation from three thousand years ago?

I do not know.

Even if only one or two hundred years separate Catholic France from modern Republican France, it seems to me that the French who erected these signs of love are so very, very remote from the French of today.

I find a rural church – one of the more beautiful I have seen in my life, in fact.

It is even open, thank God.

It was only erected in 1895, but one can feel that vast, gaping chasm which separates the French of today from those who built this glorious edifice.

One can feel it particularly as one reads the inscription I see placed there above the door:

To Jesus in the Host

Their King, Their Saviour, their adored host

The inhabitants of Vaylats, making with joy all the necessary sacrifices, have erected this church

as a humble monument of their faith, their religion and their love.

Again, this is 1895. Not the Middle Ages …

But the French who sacrificed for this church are almost beyond the comprehension of the vast majority of their descendants.

The Catholic Church: Is it not still active in France?

Well yes, barely

But it exists in a form that would be scarcely recognisable to those humble inhabitants of Vaylats …

In the churches here, when they are open, you will find the publicity for the modern Church.

And it is not so very different from the publicity for the modern world.

Much of it, indistinguishable from advertising to support a third world charity say …

To help the misery of the third world is a good thing, no doubt

The sheer horror and misery …

But this is the Church!

None of this modern publicité is about the Vertical, the Transcendent, the Mystery …

Humble peasants of Vaylats in 1895 you would have no idea as to what happened to the Church of

Your King

Your Saviour

Your Adored Host

Next Installment: A Cryptic Traditional Catholic Travelogue 11

 

From Amazon USA:

These can also be found in our Amazon UK store here, as well as in in our Reviews. Links to each review here:(The Power and the Glory) (The Portal of Hope) (Meditations on the Tarot) (Marian Apparitions) (The Heart of the Redeemer).

 

 

This entry was posted in Roger's Weblog and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

3 Trackbacks

  1. […] Allow me to illustrate, dear Reader, by quoting from something I have said elsewhere at this site about ‘the lost civilisation’ of Catholic France: […]

  2. […] are pieces about our travels through the Vendée and the wasteland that Catholic France is […]

  3. […] « A Cryptic Traditional Catholic Travelogue 8: Liberal, No More … A Cryptic Traditional Catholic Travelogue 10: Pyramids on the Nile » […]

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*
*

 
  • The Gentle Traditionalist Returns!

  • First Video from Kim Buck!

  • EWTN Interview with Roger Buck here!

    TWO-part “Celtic Connections” EWTN  Interview!

    Part One here.

    Part Two here.

  • YouTube Channel – Featured Video with Roger Buck

    Probably my favourite video. Shorter, more succinct, it captures the essence of so much I’m trying to say …

  • Books from Roger Buck

     

    The Gentle Traditionalist

     

    ”Roger Buck ... in the spirit of Chesterton and Belloc ... takes on everything—from the reforms of Vatican II to the New Age ... a wonderful book.”— MICHAEL MARTIN

    ”A tale of whimsical fantasy, melancholy realism, and supernatural joy ... Buck’s deftly-reasoned post-modern apologetic for full-blooded Catholicism—a Syllabus of Errors in narrative form, a rousing hymn to ‘meaning, grace, beauty, life’.” — PETER KWASNIEWSKI

    "As brilliant a guide for the perplexed as this age is capable of producing” — CHARLES A. COULOMBE

    buy-at-amazon

    See Reviews in Full Here!

     

    Read First Chapter Online Here!

     

    Cor Jesu Sacratissimum

     

    cor-jesu-roger-buck

    ”Buck goes to the heart of the problem paralyzing our broken-hearted world ... moving beyond the spirit of the age to the Spirit who moves all ages.” — JOSEPH PEARCE

    ”In this elegant feast of a book, Roger Buck ... expertly skewers the modern world ... without a drop of malice in his compassionate soul ... to reveal the bright, shining love and truth at the center of the universe—symbolised by the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and incarnate in the Catholic Church.” — CHARLES A. COULOMBE

    ”A great service to the Church ... Buck shows that the New Age is an attempt, however flawed, to escape the materialism of modernity, and that it is Catholicism in its traditional forms that can best reveal the immense reality of the suffering and love for all mankind of Christ’s Sacred Heart.”— JOSEPH SHAW

    buy-at-amazon

    See Reviews in Full Here!