Christ the King and a New Miscellany of Meaning …

 

 

Just an odd, little spontaneous burst of a post here.

And a warning: what follows, dear Reader, may seem like little more than a glorified advertisement.

You have been warned. Stop reading if you have become overly allergic to this virus of the modern world. I certainly understand …

That being said, for anyone who may be interested in the future direction of this website, certain indications may be gleaned below (as indeed they may be, too, from the numinous image of the Pope crowing Charlemagne above).

Now, books are lifeblood for a writer like myself. Yet circumstances are such that I have been somewhat starved of this lifeblood in recent times. Starved, that is to say, of many of the books I need to study for this project – fairly unusual books, which do not feature much in the secular orientation of UK libraries.

Providence, however, has arranged for a fresh infusion of this lifeblood for me. A number of books have come my way,  which feel important to me. I think in time, most of them will impact me significantly and shape the future of this webproject.

This does not mean that I am in full accord and agreement with every one of them!

As I have said (for example in my review of the leftish The Middle Mind: Why Americans Don’t Think for Themselves ) I believe in reading widely across a spectrum, from Left to Right, from academic to popular to pious …

For example, I am now reading Anne Carroll’s Christ the King: Lord of History. Here is a very simple, very traditional book of history from a Catholic perspective, written for American high school students.

To my mind, it is a little too simple at times, I regret to say. Does this mean it is simply worthless junk? Indeed no!

Because most history books are too simple, really – as well as biased.

For example, I have reviewed in depth Jonas’ France and the Cult of the Sacred Heart. Here is a book from the secular liberal academia of modernity. How frequently it reduces the Catholic Faith to simple Freudianism!

Yet although the simplistic Dr Jonas will be highly praised in the Academy, the simplified Anne Carroll will be laughed to scorn.

But what Anne Carroll writes is very frequently beautiful. Moreover, this very accessible Catholic high school text can be very helpful for a getting a background to the history and politics in Valentin Tomberg’s writings – that I intend to explore more fully as time permits.

Interestingly, I tried to create an Amazon advert displaying this book and found that the Amazon computers couldn’t manage it.

Yes: the books that seem most important to me in getting grips with the crisis of the world are far, far down the priorities of not only European libraries, but even goliaths like Amazon.

For me, there is poignancy here. What seems critically important to me is near-invisible in our society.

In any event you can find Christ the King Lord of History at Amazon here, if you like – alongside copious criticism!

Again, it is not that I completely reject such criticism. Carroll is somewhat open to it, I think – however noble her intentions.

That being said, some of the criticism at Amazon is ranting and ridiculous. (Please take it with a pinch of salt, if you do follow the link. And perhaps look at the rebuttals, as well.)

In any event, while people busy themselves sneering at Carroll’s Catholic bias, few of them suspect that the secular academy might be every bit as biased

Here once more, is why I think it good to read around and not be duped by either secular reductionism or by an overly-simplified Catholic Traditionalism. Here is why I interest myself in history books as diverse as that of the Freudian Jonas or the Traditional Carroll …

 

From Roger Buck, co-author of this site. Click to buy at Amazon worldwide!

Belloc-Traditionalist

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